RC Nightmare Community Blog

Professional Racing – Is it for You?

Hey everyone! So, a lot of my posts involve recent news from RC racing, news about top drivers, or upcoming professional races and sometimes you wonder, how did these guys get into professional racing? Am I good enough? A lot of us think it would be amazing to be a driver like Ryan Maifield on Team Associated or the like, but for some of us, it is better to keep RC a hobby. Here are some of the details of professional racing.

Some of the perks

In order to even be in the professional RC world and earn a salary, drivers have to have a sponsor to back them. This can be tough to get. Here are a few things that companies who sponsor look for in a driver:

-Approximately one of the fastest 10-20 drivers in the world in their respective class.

-Name recognition that is known well throughout the Hobby that can be used in advertising and marketing of said company.

-The knowledge and ability to test new products and provide feedback to help improve the car of said company.

-A Personality that can do one of many things including attract attention when said driver is racing, or being known as uber helpful off the track to anyone with a question or needing assistance.

-The ability and willingness to endure long hours of traveling either by plane or by car to reach said event. (I for instance flew over 125,000 miles last year attending events).

-Much of what a top driver offers a company can be summed up in a few key words. Marketing, Advertising, Personable, Knowledgeable, Fast as all Get Out!

So, to be sponsored by a company, you need to be very, very good. As also stated above, pro racing takes a lot of time out of your schedule so you would have to be very dedicated to the sport. Most drivers are out racing 40-46 weeks a year can be quite hard on a family. Racing R/C cars full time is really not a normal occupation, just like any professional sport. Schedules are hard and your home for a week then gone for 2 or 3. It can be very taxing. Therefore, you have to have the mental, physical, and emotional capacity to be away from friends and family for long periods of time.

If you love this hobby, that may not mean you should go pro. Going pro means turning your hobby into a job, and a lot of us have hobbies so that we have something fun to do that ISN’T a job to us – its fun. Going pro is kind of like saying goodbye to the hobby part of RC. From then on, you are the face of your company and are expected to win. No more fun and games in the backyard bashing.

On the other hand, becoming a professional RC racer can be very rewarding. Like anyone who plays sports, we thrive on the competition and the thrill of winning. If you have the time and dedication/love for RC and the skills to fit in, more power to ya! Good luck out there!

5 thoughts on “Professional Racing – Is it for You?

  1. Matt says:

    i for one am not good enough. i win consistently at my local track, so i decided to try a bigger race. Got my ass HANDED to me. Won the D Main though :)

  2. News says:

    Well good for you for attempting – most people don’t even have the kahunas to even try. And good job winning the D Main!!

  3. dizzyinzo says:

    i like how the picture has some of the perks and its a guy surrounded by women and expensive RC cars….. the life

  4. Julian says:

    That’s very insightful. I am keen to know just how much a pro RC Racer can make per annum? An average will do.

  5. News says:

    Pro drivers vary a ton in what they get paid. Some say they make $200/month, or someone with sponsors and who has won huge events may make about $75k-$100k but it is rare to repeat that year after year, almost impossible. No one really knows. It depends on the driver’s contract and other factors but to make Pro RC racing a career, you have to be AT THE TOP of your class and able to stay there.

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