RC Nightmare Community Blog

What Class To Race

When you first get into racing RC cars or trucks there are a lot of choices when it comes to running classes.  The two main classed are stock and modified.  Stock class means you are running your RC with the equipment it came with, or “stock class”.  Stock class can also be really nice upgraded parts but still qualifies as “stock”.  For example we have an Associated B4.1 buggy that had an electronic speed control that cost something like $300 but still races in the stock class.  It really has mostly to do with the motor.  Motors are measured in a variety of ways, either tuns, KV or some other methods.  They can be brushed or brushless but the level of competition is a little different.  Depending on what you want to compete on should help you determine which class you want to hit up.

The Modified Class

This class is going to have a lot of different setups.  You will be competing against a wide variety of motors and vehicle setups.  While you compete on the setup level you are also competing on a skill level.  Budget comes into play with really both classes but at least locally here, in Wisconsin having a larger budget generally puts people into the modified class.  If you want to run a variety of motors, and really be able to tune things the modified class is really right for you.

The Stock Class

If you want to compete more on driving skill you are going to want to pursue the stock class.  When the different vehicles out there compete on the stock level the general motor specifications will put all the RC trucks and cars at the same overall speed.  You can still change almost all the other settings, gear ratios, servos, remote settings, and much more.  You really compete on driving skill and you ability to tune your vehicle.  Being able to get the absolute maximum out of your stock parts, and being one of the top drivers on the platform is going to be what gets you the wins.

Summing It Up:

Sure you could argue that good driving is important in either class and sure we can’t deny that.  The fact of the matter, at least in our opinion is that driving is more important in the stock class.  You are not going to be able to just out drive your competition, there could be 2-3 trucks or cars that will be the exact same setup as you.

You are going to want to spend your free time tuning your RC the best you can and taking as much lap time as possible to get your lines down.  You might not be clearing those triples like you want but neither will your competition.  If you have the need for speed, and want to try a wide variety of motors then running in the modified class is really the way to go, of course thats only our opinion.

17 thoughts on “What Class To Race

  1. jdorty9 says:

    Thanks man!Now i think i am going to get right to tuning up my car and powning all them other drivers.

  2. jeremy says:

    great to hear!

  3. Rockit says:

    I love they way the track that i run does it. If it came on the SCT and is brushed, it goes to the stock class. Pretty much everything else goes. If it is brushless it goes to the modified class. To me it is pretty simple. if you have to cheat to win, then go ahead. You are the only one losing. Just my two cents. I am new to racing, but I am way more excited than a 39 year-old should be about it. I just love being out there.

  4. jeremy says:

    Great to hear! Glad to have you

  5. beast says:

    how can i post blog things

  6. jeremy says:

    This is the blog

  7. Cpt.ATo says:

    ok so if i have a rustler with some basic aluminum parts is that considered stock or modified?

  8. 5g5r5a5n5t5 says:

    Thank you so much for the advice. Stock is probably cheaper to be competitive? Now the final difficult decision…. on or off road :-/ hahaha

  9. jeremy says:

    It all depends what you want to do with it, I prefer off but mostly because thats what is around where I live..

  10. jeremy says:

    thats still stock it really comes down to the motor that all

  11. bobthebobd4 says:

    do ppl run down stops when racing? and at what setting?

  12. jeremy says:

    What do you mean run down?

  13. bobthebobd4 says:

    down stop screws on the a arms

  14. Slidin'Fox says:

    I’ve seen for Stock classes in SCT that 17.5T brushless is allowed.

    Also what would be good to cover is the diffrent classes and skill levels recommended for them.

    Honestly from what I’ve seen, 2wd SCTs is not the best class for beginners. I’ve let several friends and family members who have never tried RC before to drive my track, an uncle of mine got a slash, and it’s taking him a lot of getting use to before he’s starting to be able to drive it with any consistancy.

    Although 2wd is easier to work on, and maintain, 4wd offers a lot more traction and would probably be easier for beginners to drive (in a stock class form). I know the 1/18 scale 4wd buggies are recommended for beginers.

  15. Niro says:

    Thanks for the advice..im thinking of getting one more now..

  16. Russ says:

    I think its best to start out in a stock class. Many new racers get sucked into spending a lot of money trying to win races, when what they need is patience and practice. After your abilities improve the hop-ups may make a difference, but then you’ve moved up to a different class of racer ! Its fun buying more stuff , but stay in your budget !

  17. [...] like I do you will notice two distinct categories of vehicles.  You have people racing either stock or modified vehicles. Stock basically means exactly what it sounds like, everything is as it was from the factory.  [...]

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