RC Nightmare Community Blog

When To Move To Larger Scale

A lot of us start out in the smaller scales of RC, typically smaller than 1/10 scale.  Something like 1/16 or 1/24 is usually where people get started.  Me personally my first RC was a 1/10 scale traxxas slash 4X4 but I got into the hobby a little later than most.  Our lead tech Van was into the the hobby early on with 1/24 scale carpet racers.  If you are anything like me with each new RC you get you are drawn to getting bigger and faster, but with that comes a larger and larger price tag.  You have to be ready before you run up in size.  Ebay is littered with examples of people that jumped in too quickly and ended up with an $800 paper weight.  Below are a few tips to think over before you take the plunge.

Example Of 1/5 Scale Monster

You Must Be Comfortable Making Repairs:

When you run a kit larger than 1/10 scale you are talking about moving some serious weight with things in the 1/5 scale range weighing as much as 30 pounds or more.  Things are larger and at least for some people a lot easier to repair, things will in fact break and break often.  If you do not want to spend a fortune buying replacement parts you should be more than comfortable making repairs to your RC.  In addition, part support from a lot of local hobby shops will be weak at best so you must be able to handle things on your own or deal with making orders online.

You Must Have Funds For Upgrades & Repairs:

Once you move up scales literally everything costs a lot more money.  You shouldn’t get into large scale RC trucks and cars unless you have the money to put into  it.  For example if you are spending your last few dollars to purchase the kit, you will likely be stressed by the expense you will incur with upgrades or repairs to your RCs.  One of the fun parts of the RC hobby is making upgrades, toying with your set up.  If you cannot afford to make them it can be frustrating, or worse if something breaks and you cannot afford to fix it your rig will just be sitting there until you can.

You Must Have Room To Run It:

If you have a favorite spot to run your RC your half way there.  Now, think about how big it is.  If you’re thinking a back yard is big enough to run a 1/5 scale you had better have a pretty big yard.  Check with your local track to see if they even have anything available in that class or know of a place where you can run your monster.  When I moved up to 1/8 scale I was pretty amazed about how big it was and how much room it needed to run.  Luckily I have access to a large section of land my folks own.  If it were not for that I wouldn’t have anywhere I could even run it.  1/8 scale RC’s and larger require a lot of room to run so you need to plan ahead before diving into them.

If you are able to satisfy all three of the above questions then you for the most part should be ready to start moving up scales.  It is important however to keep things like these in mind before making a large RC purchase.  I have heard a lot of horror stories about 1/5 scale purchases and even 1/8 scale can require a good amount of thought.

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